A CDL license today allows truckers to choose from a variety of driving positions. The trucking industry provides many lifestyle options for drivers. The goal is to find the right company and the right position to satisfy a taste for the open road. When considering your path, becoming a regional truck driver could be the perfect fit.

Types of Truck Driver Positions

OTR

OTR stands for “over the road” and refers to truck drivers hauling freight over long distances across the United States and Canada. Typically, drivers spend 3-4 weeks at a time on the road. Delivering items such as heavy freight, machinery, construction materials, and other equipment.

Dedicated

Truckers with a dedicated route service the same company, same freight, or location regularly. Often truck drivers pick up loads at regular locations and deliver to regular or dedicated customers.

Local

Local truck drivers deliver goods to customers over shorter distances. Drivers are typically home daily when they drive locally.  Many are paid by the hour as opposed to being paid by the mile with OTR or Dedicated positions.

The Regional Truck Driver

Regional trucking refers to the part of the country a driver moves goods, materials, and makes deliveries. Drivers move through divisions or regions like the Northeast or the Midwest. Usually, drivers stay within a 1,000-mile radius from their home domicile. Regional truck drivers are generally home two days per week, and in many cases, this time off falls on the weekend. Truck driving company policies typically dictate a certain number of days or hours required.


I’m a regional truck driver, so I’m home every weekend. Last year I grossed just over $83,000. If you are thinking about coming to Barr-Nunn, I think you’d be making a wise choice.

– Jim, 22-year Barr-Nunn Transportation Truck Driver

Benefits of Being a Regional Truck Driver

Home Time: Generally, regional truck drivers live in the same area in which they work, so home time is regular and more consistent. Regional trucking jobs are rewarding for truck drivers who have family or children because of the ample amount of home time.

Familiarity: Truck drivers operating within the region regularly become very familiar with the best routes, delivery requirements, and receiving company staff. Familiarity helps driver efficiency overtime, and an enjoyable comfort level lowers stress.

No Loading or Unloading Freight: Many regional truck drivers are not required to handle freight they haul. Companies sending and receiving loads usually hire lumpers to move goods and products on and off the truck.

Salary: According to American Trucking Associations (ATA), an average regional truck driver’s annual salary is $53,000. 

Conclusion

Compared to other driving positions, a regional truck driving is very appealing. Driving regionally fits the lifestyle of a trucker who loves the open road and likes a more regular work schedule. If you are looking to become a regional truck driver, Barr-Nunn Transportation has positions available. Find open positions or apply now.


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